Zipper Needle Felted Art

Zipper Needle Felted Art

$80.00

Instructor: Rhonda Berman Description:  In the class, we will be making a broach/pin using the zipper which is hand sewn onto the wool felt backing material. The zipper design works as an outline of the shape. The inside of the design is then filled in with wool fleece using the technique of needle felting. Then buttons, beads and other metal embellishments are added. Students will learn also how to prepare a zipper and apply a pattern.  Instruction of needle felting will also be included in this class as well as finishing options. Date/Time: Friday, September 8, 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.      Harms Center Class size (min/max): 3/10 Class/Materials fees: $80/$30

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Class Description

Click here to view and download a PDF file for this class.

Zipper Needle Felted Art

Instructor: Rhonda Berman

8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Friday, September 8

Harms Center

In the class, we will be making a broach/pin using the zipper which is hand sewn onto the wool felt backing material. The zipper design works as an outline of the shape. The inside of the design is then filled in with wool fleece using the technique of needle felting. Then buttons, beads and other metal embellishments are added. Students will learn also how to prepare a zipper and apply a pattern.  Instruction of needle felting will also be included in this class as well as finishing options.

Skill Level:

All skill levels…if you can thread a needle you can do this art form. Needle felting experience is a plus but not a prerequisite for this class.

Maximum Class Size: 10

Supplies to Bring:

All materials will be provided for this class through the purchase of a kit from the instructor. Please bring scissors!

Homework to complete BEFORE class: none

Class Fee: $80

Materials Fee:

The kit will cost $30 and will be paid to the instructor.  Kits will contain pattern, backing fabric, prepared zipper, needle and thread, wool fleece, felting needles and felting foam, a variety of embellishments and a pin back. This additional charge is to cover the cost of the materials that are in the kit. Additional patterns, fleece and embellishments will also be available.

 

Instructor:

Rhonda is an artist, mother, grandmother, and wife. She lives in Omaha, Nebraska with her supportive husband, Geoff. She inherited her art skills from her father and at a young age developed a lifelong love of art in all its myriad forms and has been an artist most of her life. Although she does have a “day” job, it is her art that defines her. Rhonda enjoys working in multiple media and is a painter, rug hooker, metal artist, jewelry designer, and lamp work glass artist, amongst many more. She has won awards for her miniature paintings as well as lamp work, glass work and beading pieces. In the last few years, she has changed her area of focus to working with fibers, namely needle felting and rug hooking. Her zipper art started out as an extension of her needle felting and beading. Creating with zippers, wool and embellishments has taken on a life of its own. It started as something quick and unique to make for gifts on a family trip and now has become her new challenge of creating framed art pieces as well as wearable art. By holding impromptu classes in her home for family, friends and co-workers, Rhonda is sharing her passion for experimentation with others and loves watching the spark of creativity light up someone’s face. Zipply Art: According to Wikipedia some form of the zipper has been around since 1851. Elias Howe developed an item he called the “Automatic, Continuous Clothing Closure”. He didn’t pursue production. 1893, Whitcomb Judson debut his version “Clasp Locker” at the Chicago World’s Fair. It was not a commercial success, even though he is credited as the inventor of the zipper. 1913-1917, the Talon Inc. Company employed Gideion Sundback who devoted himself to improving the fastener titled “Separable Fastener” and is credited with the design of the modern zipper. 1923, the fastener was referred to as the “zipper” when the Goodrich Company added them to galoshes…it is sometimes believed that the name zipper came from the zip sound the zipper makes. 1925, zippers are added to clothing/jackets. 1930, zippers are added to children’s clothing promoting self-reliance because they could dress themselves. 2016, Rhonda Berman decides to use the zipper for a more impractical use…Art. Using a combination of zippers, needle felting and embellishments she has created “Zipply Art”. E-mail Address: Rhonda.A.Berman@gmail.com Please contact Rhonda if you have any questions.

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